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Publication ban removed: Hanne Schafer was first Canadian to end her life with medical help

Click to play video: 'Family and friends finally able to tell Hanne Schafer’s story' Family and friends finally able to tell Hanne Schafer’s story
WATCH ABOVE: A Calgary judge has lifted a publication ban that had been requested by Hanne Schafer when she began her persuit of a physician-assisted death. Now family and friends are sharing her story. Sarah Offin reports – Apr 27, 2016

CALGARY – Until now, she has only been identified by her initials, but a publication ban lifted Wednesday afternoon now means Canadians can know Hanne Schafer by name.

On Feb. 29, 2016 Schafer became the first Canadian to end her life with medical help.

The Supreme Court of Canada granted a constitutional exemption in relation to Schafer’s case in January, ahead of new legislation that passed to allow physician-assisted death in June.

“She would have wanted what happened to her to be out there, to help people so that they didn’t have to go through what she went through,” her husband Daniel Laurin told the Justice.

WATCH: Exclusive video interview with Daniel Laurin, the husband of Alberta woman Hanne Schafer, the first Canadian to be granted physician-assisted death.
Click to play video: '‘My wife went through hell’: husband of Alberta woman granted physician-assisted death' ‘My wife went through hell’: husband of Alberta woman granted physician-assisted death
‘My wife went through hell’: husband of Alberta woman granted physician-assisted death – Mar 7, 2016

READ MORE: Husband of Alberta woman granted physician-assisted death fights to have her name released 

Schafer had initially requested the publication ban remain in place but family said she later decided she wanted the ban removed after her death.

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“She, through [her lawyer], requested a publication ban and didn’t specify any timeline for that to end. What am I to make of that?” the Justice asked.

“She maybe didn’t understand what the full implication of the publication ban was,” Schafer’s life-long friend Mary Valentich told the court.

She said Schafer had asked her to write an obituary and agreed to its release with a photograph of her before her death.

WATCH: Mary Valentich, a long-time friend of Hanne Schafer, and Daniel Laurin, Schafer’s husband, spoke to media after a publication ban was lifted allowing them to speak publicly about Schafer and her battle for physician-assisted death.
Click to play video: 'RAW: Family and Friends of Hanne Schafer react to removal of publication ban' RAW: Family and Friends of Hanne Schafer react to removal of publication ban
RAW: Family and Friends of Hanne Schafer react to removal of publication ban – Apr 27, 2016

Her friends and family asked for the ban to be removed so they’d be able to “celebrate her life,” publishing an obituary and continuing to be an advocate for physician-assisted dying.

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“For obvious reasons it’s now not possible to ascertain her wishes fully,” the Justice said. “Now that she has received the peaceful death she sought.”

The Justice said other individuals applying for this should be fully informed and can learn from hearing Schafer’s story.

“In this case, after that peaceful passing had occurred, they did not fully understand the implications of a publications ban and how that would be affected after her death,” the Justice said.

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Hanne Schafer's husband Daniel Laurin and friend Mary Valentich hold a photo of Schafer outside court April 27, 2016. Sarah Offin, Global News
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Hanne Schafer and her husband Daniel Laurin.
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Hanne Schafer and her husband Daniel Laurin.
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Hanne Schafer was the first Canadian to end her life with medical help.
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Hanne Schafer was the first Canadian to end her life with medical help.

WATCH: Global’s coverage of the case of “Ms. S” Hanne Schafer

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