July 15, 2013 3:15 pm
Updated: July 16, 2013 10:15 am

Zimmerman trial juror who doesn’t like to read to sign book deal, called Trayvon a ‘boy of colour’

SANFORD, FL - JULY 12: Defendant George Zimmerman (R) stands with his attorneys Mark O' Mara (L) and Don West (2nd L) during his murder trial July 12, 2013 in Sanford, Florida. Zimmerman was found not guilty, on the 25th day of his trial at the Seminole County Criminal Justice Center July 13, 2013 in Sanford, Florida. Zimmerman was charged with second-degree murder in the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

Joe Burbank-Pool/Getty Images

TORONTO — One of the six jurors who found George Zimmerman not guilty of killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin has signed with a literary agent in the hopes of landing a tell-all book deal.

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Global News

Choosing to remain anonymous, juror B37 plans to write the book with her husband, a lawyer, focusing on how the jury had no option but to find Zimmerman not guilty, Martin Literary Management president Sharlene Martin told Mediabistro on Monday.

“My hope is that people will read Juror B37’s book, written with her attorney husband, and understand the commitment it takes to serve and be sequestered on a jury in a highly publicized murder trial and how important, despite one’s personal viewpoints, it is to follow the letter of the law.”

“The reader will also learn why the jurors had no option but to find Zimmerman not guilty due to the manner in which he was charged and the content of the jury instructions.”

In her voir dire, juror B37 revealed she doesn’t trust the press and describes them as untruthful and biased.

“I’m not a big fan,” said the self-confessed owner of “too many animals” — one parrot, one crow, three dogs, four cats, and a couple lizards.

She said doesn’t listen to the radio, read newspapers or online articles, but recalls hearing about the death of Trayvon Martin on the Today show.

“Newspapers are used in the parrot’s cage,” said the juror while the court camera cut to a smirking Zimmerman. “It’s been so long since I even read one. The only time I see them is when I’m putting them down on the floor.”

When asked by prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda if she had done any research into the case she said she only has time to feed her animals and sleep.

Juror B37 said she remembered riots in Sanford, however — despite authorities fretting about the possibility — there were no riots in the Florida town where Trayvon Martin was pursued and shot by Zimmerman.

When asked to describe Trayvon Martin based on what she’s heard, she said he was a “boy of colour”.

The identities of the six jurors, identified only as B76, B37, E6, B29, E40 and B51, were sealed outside the trial.

In her juror’s profile, B37, a white woman, said she and her husband used to have concealed weapons permits, but she thought weapons’ training was inadequate for permit holders. “It should become harder,” she said.

Martin Literary Management has handled other controversial titles including If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer, O.J. Simpson’s bizarrely flippant, and purportedly imaginary reconstruction of the crime he was acquitted of, after the memoir’s rights were acquired by the family of murder victim Ronald Goldman.

© Shaw Media, 2013

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