July 9, 2014 1:42 am

Everything is not awesome: Greenpeace video criticizes Lego and Shell partnership

A screenshot from Greenpeace's new ad, which criticizes LEGO for its partnership with Shell.

A new ad by environmental group Greenpeace takes aim at Lego’s partnership with Shell by using the brand’s toys against itself.

Called “LEGO: Everything is NOT awesome”, the two-minute video shows polar bears and oil workers side by side in a wintry Legoland, set to a slowed-down version of the hit “Everything is Awesome” from The Lego Movie theme song.

However, the mood soon changes.

Oil slowly covers the white blocks, eventually drowning the polar bears and winter owls.

Shell and Lego signed a two-year deal in 2012 to put Lego products in Shell stations. Greenpeace released their video on July 8 as part of a new campaign to pressure Lego into not renewing it.

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“Already more than 16 million Shell-branded LEGO sets have been sold or given away at petrol stations in 26 countries. Shell is so delighted by the results that further promotions are already planned for this year,” wrote Ian Duff, an Arctic campaigner with Greenpeace.

“But LEGO, the biggest toy company in the world, has built its brand on its continued promise of leaving a better world for children. And by teaming up with Shell it’s letting kids down.

“Global warming is perhaps the biggest threat facing all children around the world, and protecting the Arctic is about protecting the climate. By letting Shell get its oily hands on kids’ toys, LEGO is allowing Shell to pretend it’s a caring, family friendly company and helping it to get away with its Arctic aggression.”

Lego defended their partnership with Shell when Greenpeace began their campaign earlier this month.

“A co-promotion contract like the one with Shell is one of many ways we are able to bring LEGO® bricks into the hands of more children,” wrote Jørgen Vig Knudstorp, President and Chief Executive Officer of the LEGO Group.

“The Greenpeace campaign focuses on how Shell operates in a specific part of the world. We firmly believe that this matter must be handled between Shell and Greenpeace. We are saddened when the LEGO brand is used as a tool in any dispute between organisations.”

© Shaw Media, 2014

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