June 23, 2014 7:46 pm
Updated: June 24, 2014 9:40 am

Douglas Hales testifies at his first degree murder trial

Watch above: Hales testifies in his own defence at murder trial

SASKATOON – Douglas Hales has taken the stand in his first-degree murder trial. Accused of killing 25-year-old Daleen Bosse in May 2004 and offering an indignity to human remains, Hales has pleaded not guilty to both charges.

On Monday, the 36-year old father of one testified he killed Bosse but by accident with alcohol after the two partied together the night she disappeared.

When asked by defence how he was feeling as testimony got underway, Hales said “very nervous” then began to speak.

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Describing himself as “shy and conservative,” polar opposite from his small social circle, Hales testified that attending high school in Warman was “hell.” He testified he was bullied and picked on because he was chubby, wore glasses and his father worked within the school system.

At age 16, he began to abuse alcohol and later a variety of drugs including morphine, meth, coke, ecstasy, pot and mushrooms. As a result, Hales testified to going through a string of jobs after graduating because of “his addictions.”

In May 2004, Hales testified he was working at Jax nightclub as a bouncer. At this point, he was living in a trailer with a friend in the Sutherland neighbourhood after both his late grandmother and parents had kicked him out for stealing.

The evening of  Tuesday, May 18, 2004, Hales told the court he arrived at work that night and was called over by an attractive woman who asked him to buy her a drink. He did, brought her the change and a double rye and coke and the two introduced themselves, she as Daleen Bosse.

Twice during his shift, Hales said Bosse made two passes at him before she was kicked out of the nightclub. He told court he escorted Bosse to her car and said if she wanted to party he would have to finish his shift.

Hales testified to nudging her awake after his shift and the two picked up liquor and cigarettes before making a brief stop at the trailer. The two left after 15 minutes then they drove around booze cruising.

Hales testified to taking Bosse to a bush party location and noticed she appeared to have fallen asleep when he was telling her a story.

He left the vehicle to finish his drink and upon returning Hales told the court he couldn’t wake her, asking her over and over if she was alright.

When he couldn’t find a pulse, Hales said he panicked and was in no condition to drive her to the hospital.

“I decided I didn’t want to be charged with murder,” Hales said and laid Bosse down in a firepit and lit her on fire.

“I blame myself,” said Hales.

The next day, Hales said he showered and waited for his father to pick him up so they could plant flowers at his late grandmother’s house.

His next shift at Jax was that weekend and was asked by the family to put up missing persons posters.

“It was the first time I had realized what I had done was real,” said Hales.

On Aug. 10, 2008, Hales was arrested and charged with her murder after confessing to undercover officers in an RCMP ‘Mr. Big’ sting operation.

Court heard Hales testify that during the sting he lied to officers to fit in including having violent encounters with women.

“I wanted to show them, I was just like them,” said Hales.

He testified he needed to make money for his sick son.

“If you don’t fit in, you don’t belong,” testified Hales, fitting in “could mean more money, bigger jobs.”

At one point, he says he started to idolize the one officer as his involvement with the staged criminal organization heightened.

“He was more than just a friend, he was a brother.”

Court is scheduled to resume Tuesday and is slated to end by Wednesday.

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