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Province announces review of Alberta Motor Vehicle Industry Council

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WATCH ABOVE: NDP Government orders review of Alberta Motor Vehicle Industry Council. Tony Tighe reports on allegations AMVIC has let consumers down – Aug 11, 2016

The Alberta NDP government says it’s taking steps to restore consumer confidence in the province’s automotive industry.

The government has appointed former mayor of Spruce Grove, Alta. George Cuff to conduct a review of the Alberta Motor Vehicle Industry Council (AMVIC).

The group was created to handle consumer complaints regarding the industry, but Service Alberta Minister Stephanie McLean says it hasn’t been meeting that mandate.

“There have been lingering questions about AMVIC’s operations and effectiveness,” McLean said Thursday. “Our government has continued to hear concerns raised by everyday Albertans and industry as to whether AMVIC is fully meeting its mandate of protecting consumers.

“This uncertainty is bad for Albertans and bad for the important industries regulated by AMVIC. It cannot continue.”

Susan Rachkewich bought a vehicle from Calgary’s Treadz Automotive in 2014.

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The dealer was supposed to pay off the loan on their trade-in and include the payments in their refinancing.

She says that was never done and is still paying for two vehicles.

Treadz went out of business and the owners have since been charged with 165 counts of fraud and forgery.

Rachkewich alleges there had been complaints to AMVIC about Treadz for months before and she has since filed a class action lawsuit against the government.

“I’m a little bit skeptical about the review,” Rachkewich said.

“It depends on what comes out of it. Is it just more lip service? How many reviews do there have to be before there’s actual change that benefits the consumer, the taxpayer?”

Cuff will lead the review, which is expected to take three to four months. He will then recommend what, if any, changes the province should make to AMVIC.

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