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Homeless Montreal busker has violin stolen, Orchestre Métropolitain gifts him new instrument

Click to play video: 'Homeless Montreal man gets new violin after his old one was stolen' Homeless Montreal man gets new violin after his old one was stolen
WATCH ABOVE: Homeless Montreal man gets new violin after his old one was stolen – Apr 13, 2016

A homeless Montreal musician, who often busks in the city’s Metro system, is back playing music after his violin was stolen earlier this week.

Mark Landry, who often plays violin for commuters during the morning rush hour, awoke Tuesday to find his instrument had been stolen.

A passerby noticed the man and posted an image of him on Facebook with a message on his behalf.

“I publish this picture at his request, in the hope that a Good Samaritan has a violin to give… Share!” Marie-Philippe ML wrote in French.

The Montrealer’s post was quickly shared on social media and caught the attention of Orchestre Métropolitain, a Montreal orchestra.

Orchestra members decided to take matters in their own hands to get music back into Landry’s life. So, the group reached out to a local violin shop, La Maison du Violon, where the store offered to provide a new violin and case at cost price.

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“The Orchestre Métropolitain and La Maison du Violon are pleased to offer a new violin to Mark, who will be able to continue to beautify the daily subway riders!” the orchestra wrote in French on Facebook.

“When we heard what happened to you we contacted our friends,” Jean Dupre, president of Orchestre Métropolitain, said Landry as he presented the man with the new violin. “We wanted to give you the opportunity to do what you do best, to earn a living and to play the violin again.”

Within minutes of receiving his new violin, Landry showed what he does best and put on a small performance for the media and passersby.

“You know what I’m going to do? I’m going to play you a piece of music,” he said. “You know something, I wrote a new song. I’m doing a lot with poetry,” he said.

Watch the full clip above.

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