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Moncton break-dancing dentist releases ‘Old Town Road’ remake to promote oral hygiene

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When you first meet Moncton’s Dr. Luc Sipkema, he comes off as a pretty clinical and serious guy.

“Everybody has got that professional side and then their true self,” said Sipkema, who calls himself a bit of a goofball.

He showed off his silly side when he recently released a parody video of “Old Town Road” to promote dental health.

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Sipkema says the catchy song, which he wrote himself, serves as a reminder for people to take care of their chompers.

In the video, Sipkema can be seen singing and dancing to lyrics such as “you have to floss the back where the gums attack, and if your tarter is black you’ve got to ultrasonic that … clean your teeth until there is back no more and their gonna shine like never before.”

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The video has received 15,000 hits on YouTube in four days.

Being good sports, his staff played extras in the video. His receptionist, Terriline Porelle, said patients are coming into the office laughing, having seen a silly side of their doc he’s long kept under wraps.

“I think it makes them a little less nervous for people who are nervous to go to the dentist,” she said.

Sipkema admits that his singing is a little pitchy.

“I have never had any lessons,” he joked.

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But, in the video, he does reveal a hidden talent when he busts a move near the end. Sipkema attributes his dance moves to time spent with a break-dancing crew when he was a teenager.

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But Sipkema says his clinical older bones don’t move like they use to.

“Generally you just end up hurting for a few days after,” he joked.

Worth it though, he said, if he convinces people listen to the lyrics and keep on brushing.

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