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Joffre Peak sheds more rock amid 2nd massive rockslide in a week

Joffre Peak has been hit by a second rockslide in a week, leaving a massive scar on its northeast face.
Joffre Peak has been hit by a second rockslide in a week, leaving a massive scar on its northeast face. Courtesy: Nicholas Zichy

For the second time in a week, thousands of tonnes of rock have peeled off a well-known B.C. mountain.

Backcountry enthusiast Nicholas Zichy captured a photo of a new, larger rockslide on the northeast face of Joffre Peak around 6:30 p.m. on Thursday.

WATCH: Video depicts aftermath of Sunday landslide from Joffre Peak

Click to play video: 'Landslide at Joffre peak, no injuries or fatalities reported' Landslide at Joffre peak, no injuries or fatalities reported
Landslide at Joffre peak, no injuries or fatalities reported – May 13, 2019

READ MORE: No injuries reported in massive landslide from B.C.’s Joffre Peak

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It was not immediately clear when the second slide had occurred, nor whether anyone had been hurt.

A graphic depicts the two points on Joffre Peak where rockslides occurred this week. Courtesy: Steve Jones

The first slide is believed to have taken place Sunday night, sending a massive debris field down into the Cerise Creek drainage.

Both slides are on the opposite face of Mt. Joffre from the popular Joffre Lakes provincial park.

Members of B.C.’s backcountry touring and mountaineering community took to social media Thursday to express their dismay at the latest slide, with many lamenting the loss of the Central Couloir route.

GALLERY: Photos show Sunday’s smaller rockslide on Joffre Peak

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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters
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Aerial photos captured by Blackcomb Helicopters show the massive scale of the slide. Ken Nickel / Blackcomb Helicopters

Some worried that the region should be closed to visitors for safety reasons, while others theorized a third buttress on the mountain face would be next to come down.

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Earlier this week, the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District said it was in consultations with the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations to see if a geotechnical engineer would be deployed to the area.

Global News has requested comment from both agencies.

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