November 17, 2018 9:38 pm
Updated: November 18, 2018 12:16 am

Five more bodies found as Northern California wildfire death toll rises to 76

WATCH ABOVE: Fire officials in California announce that five more bodies have been found bringing the total deceased up to 76.

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Forensic recovery teams searched for more victims in the charred wreckage of the northern California town of Paradise on Saturday as the number of people listed as missing in the state’s deadliest wildfire topped 1,000.

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President Donald Trump visited the devastated small community in the Sierra foothills, 175 miles (280 km) north of San Francisco, where authorities say the remains of at least 71 people have been recovered.

READ MORE: Donald Trump visits California wildfire zones

Paradise was home to nearly 27,000 residents before it was largely incinerated by the blaze on the night of Nov. 8.

“Nobody could have thought this would ever happen,” Trump told reporters amid the charred wreckage of the town’s Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park.

“This is very sad to see. As far as the lives are concerned, nobody knows quite yet,” Trump said. “Right now we want to take care of the people who have been so badly hurt.”

WATCH: Trump says ‘it’s total devastation,’ thanks responders

Trump was flanked by California Governor Jerry Brown and Governor-elect Gavin Newsom. Brown said the federal government was doing what it needed to do, including supporting first responders and helping with clean-up and search for victims.

The disaster already ranks among the deadliest U.S. wildfires since the turn of the last century. Eighty-seven people perished in the Big Burn firestorm that swept the Northern Rockies in August of 1910. Minnesota’s Cloquet Fire in October of 1918 killed 450 people.

Trump has blamed the recent spate of fires on forest mismanagement, and he said he discussed the issue with Brown and Newsom on the ride into Paradise.

“I don’t think we’ll have this again to this extent,” Trump said of the fire. “Hopefully this is going to be the last of these because this was a really, really bad one.”

WATCH: Trump blames forest management as he visits California’s wildfire zone

Asked whether the scenes of devastation had changed his view on climate change, Trump said: “No. I have a strong opinion. I want great climate and we’re going to have that and we’re going to have forests that are very safe.”

Authorities attribute the high death toll from the blaze – dubbed “Camp Fire” – partly to the speed with which flames raced through the town with little warning, driven by howling winds and fueled by drought-desiccated scrub and trees.

READ MORE: California crews search for wildfire victims as list of missing surpasses 1,000

More than a week later, firefighters have managed to carve containment lines around 55 percent of the blaze’s perimeter. The fire covered 148,000 acres (60,000 hectares), fire officials said.

Besides the toll on human life, property losses from the blaze make it the most destructive in California history, posing the additional challenge of providing long-term shelter for many thousands of displaced residents.

WATCH: Video shows firefighter working hard to battle back flames in California wildfire

Evacuees

With more than 9,700 homes up in smoke, many refugees have taken up temporary residence with friends and family, while others have pitched tents or were living out of their vehicles.

At least 1,100 evacuees were being housed in 14 emergency shelters set up in churches, schools and community centers around the region, with a total of more than 47,000 people remaining under evacuation orders, authorities said.

Several shelters are full and, although authorities say they still have space for everyone, hundreds of people have been camping in tents and cars in the area.

Search teams with cadaver dogs have combed through rubble-strewn expanses of burned-out neighborhoods looking for bodies.

WATCH: Drone video shows devastation to Paradise caused by fires

On Friday night, Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said the remains of eight more fire victims were recovered during the day, bringing the death toll to 71.

Honea said the total roster of people unaccounted for had swelled to 1,011 – more than triple the number counted as missing on Thursday afternoon.

“This is a dynamic list,” Honea told reporters, saying it was compiled from “raw data” that likely included some duplications or multiple spellings of names.

READ MORE: Canadian couple from B.C. helping feed fire-affected residents in California

Honea bristled when asked whether many of those listed at this point, more than a week after the disaster, were expected to end up either deceased or declared missing and presumed dead.

“I don’t think it’s appropriate for any of us to sit and speculate about what the future holds,” he said. As of Friday, he said, 329 individuals previously reported missing had turned up alive.

List of the missing

The names were being compiled from information received from a special hotline, along with email reports and a review of emergency 911 calls that came in on the first night of the fire, Honea said.

Some listed have likely survived but not yet notified family or authorities. Others may not have been immediately listed because of delays in reporting them.

Weather conditions have since turned more to firefighters’ favor, though strong, gusty winds and lower humidity were expected to return late on Saturday through early Sunday ahead of rain forecast for mid-week.

WATCH: Firefighting operation ‘like an Iraqi war’, Zinke says

The outbreak of Camp Fire coincided with a series of smaller blazes in Southern California, most notably the Woolsey Fire, which is linked to three fatalities and has destroyed at least 500 structures near the Malibu coast west of Los Angeles. It was 78 percent contained on Friday night.

Scientists have said the growing frequency and intensity of wildfires in California and elsewhere across the West are largely attributable to prolonged drought that is symptomatic of climate change.

The precise causes of the Camp and Woolsey Fires were under investigation, but electric utilities have reported equipment problems in the vicinity of both blazes around the time they erupted.

© 2018 Reuters

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