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John Oakley Show – Monday May 15, 2017

Interim Conservative Leader Rona Ambrose asks a question during Question Period in the Hosue of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, May 15, 2017. Ambrose is expected to announce Tuesday that she will resign her seat in the House of Commons this summer.
Interim Conservative Leader Rona Ambrose asks a question during Question Period in the Hosue of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, May 15, 2017. Ambrose is expected to announce Tuesday that she will resign her seat in the House of Commons this summer. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

If you can read this then you have not been hacked… yet! We will get into everything you need to know about the “Wanna Cry” breach plus new workplace rules being proposed in Ontario, and music in school on the decline. All that, plus more ‘topics worthy of discussion’

 

Province considers boosting minimum wage, increasing paid sick days and more

Liberal government will take action in the next few days to strengthen current labour laws and enhance protection for Ontario’s workers including: Raising minimum wage to $15 per hour, right to sick pay, increasing vacation pay to 3 weeks and oversight over contract jobs. Deena Ladd is with Workers Action Centre and says there haven’t been any (employment) legislative changes in over 30 years.

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READ MORE: Ontario business group warns against major provincial labour law changes

 

The WannaCry ransomware cyber attack hits some of the world’s largest economies

The worldwide “ransomware” cyberattack wreaked havoc in hospitals, schools and offices across the globe on Monday. Asia reported thousands of new cases but no large-scale breakdowns as workers started the week by booting up their computers. AM640 tech expert David Shipley says the full extent of the damage from the cyberattack felt in 150 countries could worsen if more malicious variations of the online extortion scheme appear.

READ MORE: More countries targeted by ransomware cyberattack as workweek begins

 

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Music education in Ontario is suffering due to lack of funding and qualified music teachers

A report by People for Education suggests that number of music teachers at Ontario schools has fallen 7% in last decade.

READ MORE: Elementary student coders to showcase their games in London

 

 

Topics worthy of discussion

Adrienne Batra of Sun Media, Mike Van Soelen at Navigator and Toronto Councillor Gord Perks take a turn at the panel to discuss GRABHER, workplace rule changes and music in schools.

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