August 10, 2016 12:47 am

Contractor wanted to remove burnt trees from Fort McMurray

A giant fireball is seen as a wildfire rips through the forest 16 kilometres south of Fort McMurray, Alta. on Highway 63 Saturday, May 7, 2016.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
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Fort McMurray is looking to get rid of dead and burnt trees, three months after a devastating wildfire ripped through the area.

The Region Municipality of Wood Buffalo has released a request for proposal (RFP) for a contractor to do hazardous tree removal and disposal.

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The May wildfire ultimately destroyed 589,995 hectares, approximately 2,400 structures as well as thousands of trees.

READ MORE: ‘We’re going to see more Fort McMurrays’: wildfire safety advocate

The contractor is being asked to remove and properly dispose of trees from trails, roadways, municipal properties, parks infrastructure and homes in burnt neighbourhoods.

The work will involve disposing of “burnt trees that have fallen and gotten hung up on branches of adjacent trees, trees with burnt roots that are leaning but haven’t fallen over, and trees that are partially burnt near the base and have little to no structural support.”

The RFP states the majority of trees are either dead or unlikely to survive due to excessive burn and damage.

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The municipality is asking the contractor to prioritize work first in Thickwood Heights then Abasand, Beacon Hill and downtown.

“Trees are to be cut as close to ground as possible and stumps and root system are to remain to assist in erosion control and provide soil stability,” the RFP reads.

The RFP states the burnt trees could fall across roadways, trails and homes and could pose a safety risk to the public.

READ MORE: Fort McMurray wildfire update: housing benefit deadline, free camping remains

The municipality wants to have the trees removed by Oct. 31.

© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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