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Ontario Human Rights Commission calls for end to carding

Mark Saunders speaks to reporters while being introduced at a press conference in Toronto on Monday, April 20, 2015. Just days after Toronto's mayor called for an end to the practice of randomly stopping and questioning residents in the streets, the city's new police chief says it can enhance public safety when done properly.
Mark Saunders speaks to reporters while being introduced at a press conference in Toronto on Monday, April 20, 2015. Just days after Toronto's mayor called for an end to the practice of randomly stopping and questioning residents in the streets, the city's new police chief says it can enhance public safety when done properly. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

TORONTO – Ontario’s human rights commission is calling on Toronto police to scrap the practice of randomly stopping and questioning residents in the streets, known as carding.

In its annual report, the commission says it is looking at how to ensure bias-free policing in the province.

The report calls racial profiling “deeply corrosive.”

In particular, it says profiling by Toronto police needs an effective solution.

But the city’s new police Chief Mark Saunders says carding can enhance public safety when done properly.

The commission’s report comes a day after a law student – who says he’s been carded 30 times – launched a constitutional challenge to carding.

(The Canadian Press)

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