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More than half of Canadians believe their sex life is great: poll

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As if a failed marriage isn’t bad enough for the heart: new research suggests that divorce increases your risk of heart attack, even if you remarry. Getty Images

When it comes to sexual intimacy, more than half of Canadians believe their love life is great.

According to an Ipsos-Reid poll commissioned by Global News, 61 per cent of Canadians are more than fulfilled in the bedroom.

“Within the context of a relationship, a ‘great sex life’ usually occurs when both people are satisfied with what is happening,” says Barbara Morrison, a marital and couples therapist at Crossroads Therapeutic Solutions. “Both people need to respect each other. If they don’t, it will translate to a lack of physical and sexual intimacy” she says. 

In the coast-to-coast survey, Canadians were asked to share their thoughts and views on several different topics, including issues related to our economy, local crime, social media usage and lifestyle. The lighter side of the poll focuses on cities with the best sex life, the best cities to work and play in, as well as attitudes toward same-sex marriage and work-life balance. 

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Between the sheets
Compared to those polled in 2010, sex life satisfaction rates were slightly higher in most cities across the nation. Saskatoon saw the biggest jump at an 11 per cent increase from last year’s Ipsos-Reid results.

Morrison says that when it comes to a great sex life, both people in the relationship need to be curious and open in communicating their needs and desires. Each person needs to be able to please him or herself, and their partner. “All the sex toys and sexual positions in the world won’t create a ‘great sex life’ unless each person brings the best of themselves to the relationship,” she says.


 

All things equal
Canadians are showing their pride with three quarters of citizens polled stating they are comfortable with same-sex couples getting married.

 

Halifax was the most tolerant with 82 per cent of Haligonians saying they aren’t bothered by same-sex marriage.

According to Statistics Canada, in 2006, half of all same-sex couples in Canada lived in the nation’s three largest census metropolitan areas-Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver. While same-sex marriages were legally recognized by Ontario and British Columbia in 2003, Alberta joined the ranks in 2005 when same-sex marriage was legalized nationwide under the Civil Marriage Act.

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Slice of life
From the arts, culture and entertainment to recreational activities, green spaces and children’s playgrounds, 84 per cent of Canadians believe their city is a great place to play.
At 93 per cent, Kelowna was rated the highest while Regina came in last with 65 per cent of residents stating their city was a great place to play. 

“Kelowna offers a wide range of great outdoor experiences for all ages, from swimming and strolling along its beaches to hiking along the mountains,” says Sandeep Agrawal, professor and graduate program director at the Ryerson University’s School of Urban and Regional Planning in Toronto. “It’s a sanctuary filled with pristine lakes, abundant gardens, sandy beaches and superb services throughout the year. Due to its geographic location, Regina misses out on many of these outside features and amenities.” 

At the city level, when it comes to the quality of life people can afford, 78 per cent of Canadians believe their city is a great place to work. Saskatoon rated the highest with 90 per cent of residents agreeing with the poll question.

According to the City of Saskatoon, in 2008, the city’s gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 5.4 per cent-making it the fastest growing city in the country. The employment rate is also the third highest among Canadian metro regions. 

“Economically, Saskatoon in the last decade or so has done very well,” says Agrawal. “As a hub for natural resources and agricultural industries, Saskatoon houses the head offices of major corporations and many businesses involved in manufacturing and distribution.” 

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The world’s largest publicly traded uranium company, Cameco, and the world’s largest potash producer, PotashCorp, have corporate headquarters in Saskatoon.

Balancing the scale
Canadians are managing multiple responsibilities at work, at home and in the community effectively, with 77 per cent of Canadians satisfied with their work and home lives.

“Simply ask, is what I am doing engaging, fulfilling and sustainable? Or do I constantly feel overwhelmed, stressed and somehow not where I am meant to be?” says Steve Mitten, a master certified life coach and president of acoach4u.com.

Numbers were relatively consistent across the country, while two Saskatchewan cities ranked on the opposite ends of the spectrum. At 86 per cent, Saskatoon rated the highest in terms of viewing their lives as having good life-work balance, while Regina rated the lowest with 69 per cent. 

“A good work-life balance maximizes your overall success, meaning and well-being,” says Mitten. “If you are in a place of reasonable balance, you are able to make ongoing choices that reflect what is truly important to you.”


These are the findings of an Ipsos Reid poll conducted between August 26 to September 1, 2011 on behalf of Global Television. For this survey, a sample of 6,883 Canadians from Ipsos’ Canadian online panel.

A survey with an unweighted probability sample of this size and a 100% response rate would have an estimated margin of error of:

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+/-4.8 percentage points for each individual city/region, 19 times out of 20, of what the results would have been had the entire population of that particular city or region been polled;

+/-1.2 percentage points for the national Canadian population, 19 times out of 20, of what the results would have been had the entire population of adults living in Canada been polled.