December 12, 2013 7:30 pm
Updated: December 12, 2013 8:33 pm

Brian Burke’s bad hair day makes great Twitter fodder for kids

Brian Burke, Calgary Flames' president of hockey operations, announces the firing of GM Jay Feaster and assistant GM John Weisbrod at a press conference in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, December 12, 2013.

Larry MacDougal/The Canadian Press
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One lesson Brian Burke may have learned on Thursday: kids are the worst critics.

Burke, President of Operations for the Calgary Flames, appeared in front of media at the Scotiabank Saddledome on Thursday to announce he was turfing General Manager Jay Feaster and assistant GM John Weisbrod.

Maybe it was the stress of the announcement or his decision to take on the GM duties in the interim, but the normally well-coiffed Burke was looking a bit unkempt.

It might not have been notable had his kids not pointed it out in humorous fashion on Twitter.

His son Patrick and daughter Molly poked fun at their dad and his tussled locks.

Needless to say, their Twitter followers loved the jabs.

Patrick Burke noted that his account started booming with new followers, some of whom might not have liked the barbs about the older Burke’s disheveled locks. So, he pointed out the jokes were just that.

Patrick Burke serves as president of You Can Play Project — a much-lauded organization working to put an end to homophobia in sports and to “fight for fairness in the locker room.”

He and his father started the organization in honour of Brendan Burke — the youngest son in the family. Brendan died in a car accident in 2010 at the age of 21.

Before his untimely death, Brendan spoke publicly about being gay and started a much needed discussion about discrimination and inclusion in sports.

As the Twitter exchange with his sister got more attention, Patrick expressed surprise that it got media coverage.

A reporter’s note to Patrick: You guys made us laugh. We thought we’d pay it forward.

© 2013 Shaw Media

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