August 11, 2017 12:56 pm
Updated: August 11, 2017 1:08 pm

Chefs use ‘throwaway’ produce to make gourmet meal at fundraiser

We’ve all been there – at the grocery store looking at all of the fresh produce – picking through to find the perfect box of strawberries or a nice sounding watermelon... But what happens to the food that’s left on the shelves? That's where Loving Spoonful comes in.

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We’ve all been there – at the grocery store looking at all of the fresh produce – picking through to find the perfect box of strawberries or a nice-sounding watermelon.

But what happens to the food that’s left on the shelves?

That’s where Loving Spoonful comes in. Executive director, Mara Shaw, says we create more than enough food to give it to those who need it, rather than a garbage can.

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“We waste $31 billion worth of food every year in Canada alone. And a lot of that, we can stop, just by interrupting that waste chain,” she said.

READ MORE: Why is Canada’s inflation rate so low when life is so expensive?

For the second year, the not-for-profit held its ‘Un-Wasted Dinner’ event, where food normally earmarked for the dumpster or compost, is turned into a culinary masterpiece. 6 local chefs crafted a 5 course meal, completely made from those foods that weren’t selling elsewhere. One of the chefs involved, Ruthie Cummings, says the produce is far from far gone.

Six local chefs crafted a five-course meal, completely made from food that wasn’t selling elsewhere. One of the chefs involved, Ruthie Cummings, says the produce is far from far gone.

“These are donated items that are just a little over-ripe, or have some issues with them, or are extra surplus basically, that are perfectly good food items that can be used in a fantastic meal.”

Those attending the event, like supporter Rick Calich, says he is blown away by how much the organization does in the community to help those who can’t afford to buy perishable foods.

“The ability of this organization to extend healthy meal opportunities for people who wouldn’t otherwise get them, if not for the existence of this organization… I’m very, very moved by that.”

Last year alone, the organization delivered nearly $300,000 worth of food to those less fortunate, but Shaw says they need more support to keep the initiative going long into the future.

“We really need community support to keep it going, and it doesn’t cost us very much — because the food is free and the volunteers, but it still takes a lot of time to co-ordinate all those volunteers and the groceries, and the drop-offs, and to keep the whole thing going… So, it’s a fundraiser for that purpose as well. You know, awareness and funds,” she said.

READ MORE: Meat, dairy sectors got beef with proposed changes to Canada’s food guide

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