December 21, 2015 12:48 pm
Updated: December 21, 2015 12:55 pm

Photos capture the northern lights illuminating night sky across Canada

The northern lights as seen from Ipperwash Provincial Park, Ontario.

Courtesy Dave Patrick
A A

It got here late, but it was worth the wait.

The first of two coronal mass ejections (CME) reached Earth on Saturday, a day later  than the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) had anticipated. But the particles that were ejected from the sun earlier in the week interacted with our magnetosphere and put on a beautiful northern lights show across the country.

READ MORE: Why do we get the northern lights?

Those who had clear skies were treated to bright green arcs of light dancing across the sky, with some pinks and reds.

The sky is illuminated with reds and greens in this photo taken by Dave Patrick in Ipperwash Provincial Park, Ontario.

Courtesy Dave Patrick

Some people had a special vantage point.

But Saturday’s show wasn’t the last.

The second CME reached slammed into Earth on Sunday night, giving those who might have missed it a second chance.

The northern lights dance across the sky on the night of Dec. 20-21 over the Gardiner Dam, about 100 km south of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

File/Courtesy Garry Stone

A meteor streaks above the northern lights 12km north of Regina, Saskatchewan.

Courtesy Notanee Bourassa

The northern lights were not just visible from Canada, but from around the world.

This was the third time in two weeks that we were treated to a light show courtesy of the sun. The SWPC isn’t forecasting any for the coming days, though, with the sun, that might change.

© 2015 Shaw Media

Report an error

Comments

Want to discuss? Please read our Commenting Policy first.