August 31, 2014 1:42 pm

Walk held in Saskatoon to shed light on murdered aboriginal women

Watch above: Walk held for inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women

SASKATOON – In Canada, many are calling for a national inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women.

More than 100 people gathered by St. Paul’s Hospital in Saskatoon on Saturday to participate in a walk and to have their voices heard.

Marilyn Wapass’ sister Maxine went missing in 2001. Police found her body in a farmer’s field near Asquith, Sask. in 2002.

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“Because she was there so long, there was no cause of death, they couldn’t determine the cause of death,” said Wapass.

“There are no words to describe the grief.”

Around noon on Saturday, Wapass participated in the “walk for missing and murdered indigenous women.”

“Across this country, there are so many families that are hurting, and wanting answers. And they don’t have any,” Wapass explained.

The walk was organized by Cree elder Emil Bell. During the event he carried a petition calling on Ottawa to launch a national public inquiry.

 READ MORE: Sask. Cree elder making long trek to aid safety of aboriginal women

Bell walked from Prince Albert to Saskatoon to gain signatures and support.

“I think there needs to be a lot more action, so we can get a real good message to Stephen Harper that people are talking and they want something done about this,” said Bell.

In Manitoba, 15-year-old Tina Fontaine was found wrapped in a bag in the Red River. There have been no arrests.

Her murder has sparked outrage across Canada.

“We’ve got to address these issues from grassroots level. And that’s our home bases, and our communities,” said John Sugar, a First Nations’ rights advocate.

The walk ended with a ceremony in remembrance of the missing women and girls.

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