August 28, 2014 8:10 am
Updated: August 28, 2014 8:22 am

UPDATE: Maintenance crews fix unsafe rails near Lake Shore Blvd.

A Toronto Port Lands Company (TPLC) maintenance crew arrived Thursday morning to fix the problem with unsafe rail lines along Lake Shore Boulevard.

Mark McAllister/Global News

TORONTO – The city has taken responsibility for unsafe rail lines along Lake Shore Boulevard West near Carlaw Avenue – or least a city-owned company has.

The Toronto Port Lands Company (TPLC) own the tracks that cross over a bike path where a number of cyclists have been injured and on Thursday, maintenance crews managed to fix the problem with the rubber moulding.

The area around the track had come loose over the last couple of weeks. Tri-athlete Lynn O’Connor ended up with scrapes and bruises along one side of her body after falling.

“Who’s responsible? Why is it like that? It’s been like that for some time,” O’Connor said. “The bike path was built three or four years ago and it is dangerous.”


Story continues below
Global News

When the problem was brought to the attention of TPLC on Monday, they said it was up the city to fix it. Managers with the city’s Transportation Services department claimed it was up to TPLC.

On Tuesday, Global News was told TPLC would replace the rubber on Wednesday but as of Wednesday morning, nothing had been done.

“We need to look at areas and get them fixed,” Public Works and Infrastructure Chair Denzil Minnan-Wong said. “If there’s a bike trail that’s dangerous we need to fix that.”

The Toronto Port Lands Company is owned by the city of Toronto.

Watch: (Aug. 25) Several cyclists hurt near dangerous part of road on Lakeshore

But dangerous tracks aren’t isolated to the city’s lake shore.

Issues with decommissioned streetcar tracks near St. Clair Avenue are supposed to be resolved this month after two years of studies and reports.

A memorial still stands on Wychwood Avenue near St. Clair Avenue West where Joseph Mavec died in 2012. City crews are expected to start covering the tracks with a “thermoplastic paint” before Labour Day.

“We miss spots from time to time and if we find out there’s a problem, we should repair them,” Minnan-Wong said. “The finger pointing should stop and getting things done should be the priority.”

Other locations where the material would be used are on Strathmore Boulevard close to Woodbine Station and Kipling Avenue north of Lawrence Boulevard.

© Shaw Media, 2014

Report an error

Comments