May 29, 2014 6:20 pm

Five normal ‘super’ foods at your local grocery store

TORONTO – Acai, goji berries, quinoa – these ‘super foods’ have been making headlines recently for their numerous health benefits.

However, they can be expensive and can be hard to find.

Do shoppers really need to dig deep or go far to find healthy foods? Definitely not.

Here’s five normal ‘super’ foods you can find in your local grocery store – if you don’t already have them in your kitchen:

1.  Beans

These vegetables are packed with low-fat protein, fiber, iron and phytonutrients.

Story continues below
Global News

“Beans are in the vegetable and legume family, they’ve got lots of protein so they fill you up,” Dr. Samir Gupta said. “But also a lot of phytonutrients which have good anti-aging affects and lots of iron.”

2.  Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are one of the few things that taste sweet but are relatively low in calories. They also have Vitamin A which might protect against some cancers – but make sure to leave the potato skin on.

“You could leave the skins on for more fiber,” Gupta said, adding it’s more important that you bake the potato rather than boil it.

3.  Nuts 

Any nuts are good but stick with either peanuts or almonds. They do have fat but don’t worry so much about that – it is good, unsaturated fat.

“We’re looking for mono unsaturated fats, lots of protein and regular nut consumption reduces the risk of dying of heart disease,” Gupta said.

Nuts are also packed with protein.  Of course, moderation is key.

4.  Salmon

Salmon is generally a good source of Omega-3 fatty acids that can help protect you from heart disease.

“Any fish rich in Omega-3 fatty acids,” Gupta said.

5.  Blueberries

“[There is] lots of fiber, fills you up but also phytonutrients and Vitamin C as well as other anti-oxidants,” Gupta said.

Bonus: Green vegetables

“There’s nothing wrong with green vegetables, some of them are the sort of new exotic and new fangled ones like kale,” Gupta said. “Nothing wrong with those but just keep it nutrient rich and relatively low in calories.”

© Shaw Media, 2014

Report an error

Comments