April 27, 2014 12:42 pm

Dump and Run racks up deals for shoppers, the environment

Organized by students at Dalhousie University, the secondhand sale saw hundreds of shoppers flutter in and out of Studley Gym with used or slightly worn items, which were donated by students and residents.

Julia Wong/Global News

HALIFAX – One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, and it was cheap treasure at the annual Dump and Run Sale.

Organized by students at SMU and Dalhousie University, the secondhand sale saw hundreds of shoppers flutter in and out of Studley Gym with used or slightly worn items, which were donated by students and residents.

A panorama of the Dump and Run Sale at Dalhousie University.

Julia Wong/Global News

The sale is in its 13th year, and organizers say it’s a good way to divert items from the landfill.

“You find first years and people going back home, they don’t have anywhere to get rid of this stuff,” said coordinator Joy Samuel. “They need somewhere to get rid of it or else it’ll go straight to the dump. This is a good way for them [to do that].”

It is also good for shoppers, who could find clothes, sofas, books and even file folders at discounted prices.

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Mary Fong lives near Dalhousie University and said her family likes to support the event every year.

“We have two teenagers so [we get] lots of teenage clothes,” she said as she clutched bags of shirts and other pieces of clothing.

“We like to reduce, reuse and recycle when we can.”

It was also a family event for Theo MacLean, who arrived at the sale with his mom and two aunts.

MacLean said his family deliberately woke up early today to line up at the Dump and Run so they could take advantage of the sale.

“We love shopping for second hand things and there’s usually lots of really good things here,” he said, adding he had already picked up a camera, books and some DVDs.

The thought of helping out the environment also appealed to MacLean.

“If you’re buying secondhand, you’re not buying something new and you’re reusing it.”

Sustainability is what brought Peter Lane, his partner and two young kids to the event.

Lane came with the purpose of picking up little trinkets and some odds and ends. He notes he enjoys throwing his support behind something environmentally friendly.

“The things that are left behind by the influx of students coming in and out of the city is appealing, rather than going to Walmart,” he said.

“It’s nice to be part of keeping these things in use,” Lane said as he gestured to the books, clothes and other items flanking him.

The event is also a fundraiser for local charities, though organizers have not picked which ones will receive the donations. Samuel said previous sales have raised between $7,000 and $10,000.

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